Site Logo

Can guys get a uti

Site Logo

If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works. A urinary tract infection is an infection caused by bacteria in any part of the urinary system, which is made up of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, or urethra. Most urinary tract infections UTIs affect the bladder and the urethra, which is the tube that drains urine from the bladder to outside the body. Although a UTI is one of the most common infections in women, it is rare in men.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in men: how to approach diagnosis correctly? (14)

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): Facts You Need to Know - Urology Care Podcast

Health and Wellness Blog

Site Logo

Urinary tract infections involve the parts of the body — the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra — that produce urine and carry it out of the body.

Urinary tract infections often are classified into two types based on their location in the urinary tract:. Most cases of urinary tract infections occur in women. Of those that occur in men, relatively few affect younger men. In men older than 50, the prostate gland a gland near the bottom of the bladder, close to the urethra can enlarge and block the flow of urine from the bladder.

This condition is known as benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH. This condition can prevent the bladder from emptying completely, which increases the likelihood that bacteria will grow and trigger an infection. Cystitis is more common in men who practice anal intercourse and in those who are not circumcised. Other factors that increase the risk of urinary infections include an obstruction, such as that caused by a partial blockage of the urethra known as a stricture, and non-natural substances, such as rubber catheter tubes as may be inserted to relieve a blockage in the urethra.

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and about any previous episodes of urinary tract infection. To fully assess your risk factors, your doctor may ask about your sexual history, including your history and your partner's history of sexually transmitted diseases, condom use, multiple partners and anal intercourse. Your doctor will diagnose a urinary tract infection based on your symptoms and the results of a physical examination and laboratory tests of your urine.

In a typical urinary tract infection, your doctor will see both white blood cells infection-fighting cells and bacteria when he or she examines your urine under a microscope.

Your doctor probably will send your urine to a laboratory to identify the specific type of bacteria and specific antibiotics that can be used to eliminate the bacteria. In men, a rectal examination will allow your doctor to assess the size and shape of the prostate gland. If you are a young man with no sign of an enlarged prostate, your doctor may order additional tests to search for a urinary tract abnormality that increases the likelihood of infection. This is because urinary tract infections are relatively rare in young men with normal urinary tracts.

Additional tests may include intravenous pyelography or a computed tomography CT scan, which shows an outline of your urinary tract on X-rays; ultrasound; or cystoscopy, an examination that allows your doctor to inspect the inside of your bladder using a thin, hollow tube-like instrument.

With proper treatment, most uncomplicated urinary tract infections begin to improve in one to two days. Most urinary tract infections in men cannot be prevented. Practicing safe sex by using condoms will help to prevent infections that are transmitted through sexual contact.

In men with benign prostatic hypertrophy, cutting out caffeine and alcohol or taking certain prescription medications may help to improve urine flow and prevent the buildup of urine in the bladder, which increases the likelihood of infection. Many men with urinary infections due to an enlarged prostate gland require surgery to remove part of the gland. Because this surgery can improve urine flow, it can help prevent infections.

Doctors treat urinary tract infections with a variety of antibiotics. The results of laboratory tests on your urine can help your doctor pick the best antibiotic for your infection. In general, most uncomplicated lower tract infections will be eliminated completely by five to seven days of treatment.

Once you finish taking the antibiotics, your doctor may ask for a repeat urine sample to check that bacteria are gone. If an upper tract infection or infection of the prostate is diagnosed, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics for three weeks or longer. Men with severe upper tract infections may require hospital treatment and antibiotics given through an intravenous catheter in a vein.

This is especially true when nausea, vomiting and fever increase the risk of dehydration and prevent the use of oral antibiotics. If you are approaching age 50, call your doctor if you notice any of the following: a decrease in the force of your urine stream, difficulty in beginning urination, dribbling after you urinate, or a feeling that your bladder isn't totally empty after you finish urinating.

These could be symptoms of an enlarged prostate, a problem that can be treated effectively before it triggers a urinary tract infection. Most urinary tract infections can be treated easily with antibiotics. In a man who has a urinary tract abnormality or an enlarged prostate, repeated urinary tract infections may occur as long as the underlying problem continues to interfere with the free flow of urine.

Disclaimer: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review or update on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

Published: March, E-mail Address. First Name Optional.

Urinary Tract Infection in Men

Urinary tract infections UTIs , also called bladder infections , occur when fungi, viruses and bacteria find their way into the bladder. Normally, these irritants are flushed out of the body before they can cause symptoms. When UTIs linger, an infection can occur in your bladder cystitis or urethra urethritis.

This material must not be used for commercial purposes, or in any hospital or medical facility. Failure to comply may result in legal action. Medically reviewed by Drugs.

Though women are usually the ones plagued with irritating urinary tract infection UTI symptoms, men can develop UTIs, too. And the older a man is, the greater his risk for getting one. While urinary tract infections are common in women, with at least 40 to 60 percent of women developing a UTI during their lives, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases 1 , men are not immune to these often troublesome and potentially dangerous infections. According to the American Urological Association, 12 percent of men will have symptoms of at least one UTI during their lives. Conversely, the male anatomy can help keep this type of infection at bay.

All you need to know about UTIs in men

Urinary tract infections involve the parts of the body — the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra — that produce urine and carry it out of the body. Urinary tract infections often are classified into two types based on their location in the urinary tract:. Most cases of urinary tract infections occur in women. Of those that occur in men, relatively few affect younger men. In men older than 50, the prostate gland a gland near the bottom of the bladder, close to the urethra can enlarge and block the flow of urine from the bladder. This condition is known as benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH. This condition can prevent the bladder from emptying completely, which increases the likelihood that bacteria will grow and trigger an infection. Cystitis is more common in men who practice anal intercourse and in those who are not circumcised.

Can Men Get UTIs?

RediClinic wants every patient to be happy and healthy. Virtual Visits are available 7 days a week with extended weekday hours and accepts most major insurance plans. While women are far more likely to experience a urinary tract infection UTI , men are not immune from this problem. In fact, an estimated three percent of men get a UTI every year. Most bacteria that enter your urinary tract are washed out when you urinate.

Although bladder infections are more common in women, men can get them, too.

.

Urinary Tract Infections in Men: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Urinary Tract Infection - UTI Symptoms - Urinary Tract Infection Symptoms

.

.

Nov 15, - Can men UTI's? Although more common in women, men can get them, too. Learn the causes of urinary tract infections in males, treatment  ‎UTI Symptoms · ‎Treatment for a UTI.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 2
  1. Fenrizilkree

    It agree, very useful phrase

  2. Grok

    In my opinion you are mistaken. Let's discuss it. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.