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The woman in black quotes and analysis

Arthur Kipps is the main character and narrator of the story. We see him as a contented man at the start of the novel, but he is haunted by memories of his past. As he narrates his own ghostly tale we are first presented with a rational, keen and positive young man. He is determined to complete his work at Eel Marsh House, no matter how strange or scary the place is.

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The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

Jennet: [voiceover, echoing in Eel Marsh House] I will never forgive you for letting my boy die. I will never forgive. Never forgive. Joseph Kipps: [referring to ghostly apparition in the distance] Daddy, who's that lady? Joseph Kipps: [describing picture-drawing] That's me, that's Nanny, that's Mummy, that's you Daily: It's not natural to lose someone so young.

But if we open the door to superstition, where does that lead? It's just chasing shadows, Arthur. When we die, we go up there. We don't stay down here. Elizabeth Daily: [in an entranced chant, simulating voices of dead children] She makes us She makes us do it. She makes us They took her boy away, so now she takes us.

TV Shows. The Woman in Black is a horror novel by Susan Hill, written in the style of a traditional Gothic novel. The plot concerns a mysterious spectre that haunts a small English town, heralding the death of children. A television film based on the story, also called The Woman in Black, was produced in , with a screenplay by Nigel Kneale.

In , a theatrical film adaptation of the same name was released, starring Daniel Radcliffe. The book has also been adapted into a stage play by Stephen Mallatratt. It is the second longest-running play in the history of the West End, after The Mousetrap. Arthur Kipps: You don't believe me, do you? Daily: I believe even the most rational mind can play tricks in the dark.

Daily: Don't go chasing shadows, Arthur. Arthur Kipps: [pause, then emotionally] That's your Mummy. Arthur Kipps: Why do I look so sad? Joseph Kipps: That's what your face looks like. Powered by CITE. Know another quote from The Woman in Black? Don't let people miss on a great quote from the "The Woman in Black" movie - add it here!

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The Woman in Black - Illustrating and Supporting Points

Daniel Radcliffe stars in 'The Woman in Black' as Arthur Kipps, an attorney who winds up smack in the middle of a terrifying mystery in a small town. Not surprisingly, some of the best quotes in 'The Woman in Black' come from Radcliffe. This list includes many of the most memorable lines from the film. If you have a favorite, by all means, vote it up! And if there's a 'Woman in Black' quote that stood out to you that isn't on the list, add it.

Jennet: [voiceover, echoing in Eel Marsh House] I will never forgive you for letting my boy die. I will never forgive. Never forgive.

Fear is a human response to the threat of danger or harm. In this story there are different layers of fear and responses to it. In the first chapter, when Arthur Kipps is reminded of his ghost story, he runs to the garden, with his heart pounding. Susan Hill uses these physiological manifestations of fear throughout the book. When Arthur talks to Mr Jerome about seeing the woman in black in the graveyard, the man clutches at his wrist and seems about to collapse.

The Woman in Black Quotes

Sign in with Facebook Sign in options. Join Goodreads. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. The Woman in Black Quotes Showing of But what was 'real'? At that moment I began to doubt my own reality.

Useful Quotes for the Woman In Black Themes

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. I like to look about me at the sky above my head, whether there are moon and stars or utter darkness, and into the darkness ahead of me; I like to listen for the cries of nocturnal creatures and the moaning rise and fall of the wind… 1. It's hard not to be affected by the sounds of nature, but you don't have to go on forever, Arthur. We get it; you're an outdoors man.

When you write essays for English literature, you are expected to support your points with convincing evidence.

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The Woman in Black Movie Quotes

I had always known in my heart that the experience would never leave me, that it was now woven into my very fibers, an inextricable part of my past, but I had hoped never to have to recollect it, consciously, and in full, ever again. Like an old wound, it gave off a faint twinge now and again, but less and less often, less and less painfully, as the years went on and my happiness, sanity and equilibrium were assured. Of late, it had been like the outermost ripple on a pool, merely the faint memory of a memory.

Even though Keckwick is a tight-lipped kind of fellow, it must still be hard on Arthur to see him go. The empty and lonely surroundings at Eel Marsh House are starting to get to Arthur after he spends a while there alone. Keckwick himself is no stranger to isolation and does not wish this upon any other, as shown by his kindness here to Kipps. There was no visitor—or at least no real, human visitor—no Keckwick. Arthur is even interested in the company of Keckwick, a man who barely speaks, suggesting sheer desperation for someone to be around him, to reassure him and rescue him from his isolation.

Literary critics rarely use this last term, preferring to talk of the "narrator". But when it comes to hauntings this traditional description is fitting. Arthur Kipps is giving us a tale that he is condemned by his own memories to tell. When the novella opens, he is a man in late middle age, surrounded by adult stepchildren at Christmas. Naturally they begin to tell ghost stories: Christmas is the time for this, when the year is darkest and family or friends are gathered together to be entertained. For the classic ghost story is a performance. Some of the best ghost stories — The Turn of the Screw is the most famous example — begin with this situation: a person telling a story to a group of rapt listeners.

Get everything you need to know about The Woman in Black / Jennet Humfrye in The Woman in Black. Analysis, related quotes, timeline.

Arthur is the main character and the narrator. In the first and last chapters we see him as a man approaching old age. The youthful Arthur Kipps is a privileged, well-educated, ambitious, adventurous, impatient, arrogant, brave and foolhardy.

Suddenly conscious of the cold and the extreme bleakness and eeriness of the spot and of the gathering dusk of the November afternoon, and not wanting my spirits to become so depressed that I might begin to be affected by all sorts of morbid fancies, I was about to leave […] But, as I turned away, I glanced once again round the burial ground and then I saw again the woman with the wasted face, who had been at Mrs. Drablow's funeral. It was one of what I can only describe—and the words seem hopelessly inadequate to express what I saw—as a desperate, yearning malevolence; it was as though she were searching for something she wanted, needed— must have , more than life itself, and which had been taken from her. And, toward whoever had taken it she directed the purest evil and hatred and loathing, with all the force that was available to her.

These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. A wistful remembrance from a much older Kipps who takes the time to interrupt the flow of the narrator with an observation that expands upon the changes that have been made to his character since the events in the novel he is narrating took place. The last few words of this quote provide an ominous sense of foreshadowing that tells the reader they should be prepared to find exactly what happened to the narrator to cause another person to take the blame.

Answer the following questions carefully and be prepared to share your ideas with others in your class. There are a number of a good resources on this site and although written in a colloquial way, will provide you with some additional revision.

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