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The woman at the well john

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Start free trial. It was about noon. How can you ask me for a drink? Where can you get this living water? Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Jesus and the Woman at the Well. John Chapter 4 Bible Movie

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Chosen Jesus and the Samaritan Woman At The Well

The Woman at the Well

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Jump to navigation. We used the reading from Year A since we have six people entering the church. Other parishes may have used the Year C Gospel, Luke This reading overflows with good news that "true worship" is not found in any building or cult but in the hearts of believers who worship God "in Spirit and in Truth.

Rather than highlight the Samaritan woman's inspired missionary leadership, preachers too often rant that she was a five-time divorcee before Jesus saved her from a dissolute life of sin. I'm grateful that the deacon preaching at our parish Mass focused on an interpretation favored by New Testament scholar and Immaculate Heart of Mary Sr. Sandra Schneiders. She points to Israel's use of spousal metaphors to describe God's passionate, covenant love for the chosen people. Samaritans had strayed from monotheism and episodically worshipped other gods.

Schneiders suggests that Jesus was speaking metaphorically about Samaria's infidelity -- pointing out that Samaria's current "husband" was not a source of living water for the people.

While different scholars have offered numerous interpretations of this puzzling text, there is no real consensus. There are historical contradictions, however, that make taking it at face value a dubious enterprise at best. This is because in first century Palestine, a woman could not initiate divorce except in extremely rare circumstances. Therefore the Samaritan woman's five former husbands must have either divorced her or died.

This would have spelled disaster for her since women relied on the patriarchal household to survive. While Jesus at first affirms the woman's reply that she has no husband, he then enigmatically implies that she does have one. But before branding her as a harlot or adulteress, we would be wise to remember that Roman marriage laws stipulated only the freeborn could marry, and then only to another freeborn person.

This excluded from legal marriage the millions of freed persons former slaves who populated the empire. Living as a concubine could have been the Samaritan woman's only option if she and her "husband" were both freed persons, or if one was freeborn and the other freed.

While we will probably never know the exact historical circumstances underpinning the Samaritan woman's domestic situation, it is clear that Jesus paid no attention whatsoever to social mores that diminished women. Biblical scholar Jerome H. Neyrey spells out in detail just how unconcerned John's Gospel is about female propriety: "In John 4, all social taboos customarily separating males and females into separate worlds are systematically recognized, but broken and transformed.

This upsetting of cultural taboos, moreover, is conscious and intentional; it constitutes an essential part of the author's communication. First, a solitary Samaritan woman approaches Jesus at a public well at the wrong time of day. Since village women normally drew water only at dawn and dusk, a woman appearing alone at noon would have been considered improper. Jesus speaks to her and a lengthy conversation ensues.

The woman herself remarks on Jesus' impropriety. Jews disliked and shunned Samaritans and it was considered inappropriate for men to speak to women outside their kinship circles in public. Second, when Jesus asks the woman to call her husband, Neyrey notes, "[She] went into the village marketplace where all the men are gathered.

The narrative does not say 'marketplace,' but from our knowledge of that culture, we would be culturally accurate in imagining males gathered together in an open-air space, such as a marketplace. The message is clear. The Samaritan woman is as far removed from the proper matrona ideal of Greco-Roman culture as anyone could imagine. And yet she exhibits remarkable theological acumen sparring with Jesus over where true worship is found. Unlike the respected rabbi, Nicodemus John 3 , who meets secretly with Jesus at night and departs still doubting, the Samaritan woman meets him in broad daylight and departs a true believer.

John's Gospel portrays her as the privileged recipient of Jesus' self-revelation as "Messiah" and the great "I Am" hearkening back to Moses pointing to Jesus' oneness with the divine.

On her word, "Many of the Samaritans of that town began to believe in him This text is the longest conversation Jesus has with any woman in all four Gospels. Many scholars believe a female missionary probably evangelized Samaria and there were many Samaritan members in the diverse community for whom John's Gospel was written.

For John, the Samaritan woman represents the consummate "outsider" who, after her transformative encounter with Jesus, becomes not only an "insider" but also a leader, publicly proclaiming Jesus the Messiah to both men and women via village communication channels.

Along the way the narrative deliberately highlights and then discounts stereotypical female behaviors to which she does not conform. Yet her non-conformity presents no obstacle to her acceptance and subsequent leadership in Jesus' kinship network. For me, the most compelling piece of "good news" in this passage is that the Samaritan woman's search for true worship comes to fruition in her lengthy dialogue with Jesus.

Her joyful embrace of Jesus' teaching slakes his hunger to fulfill God's will "on earth as in heaven. The woman's search for true worship "in Spirit and in Truth" is at last fulfilled.

Jesus recognizes that he did not sow the hunger for God that already existed within her. But he did reap what another had sown. As for the Samaritan woman, she now joins a group of sowers and reapers "gathering crops for eternal life" John Joseph, Sr. Christine Schenk served urban families for 18 years as a nurse midwife before co-founding FutureChurch, where she served for 23 years.

She holds master's degrees in nursing and theology. Editor's note: We can send you an email alert every time Christine Schenk's column, Simply Spirit, is posted. Go to this page and follow directions: Email alert sign-up. Send your thoughts and reactions to Letters to the Editor. Learn more here. Join now. Blog Simply Spirit. Clueless preaching about the Samaritan woman misses the point Mar 3, Join the Conversation Send your thoughts and reactions to Letters to the Editor.

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Jesus and the Samaritan Woman

Please check the reference to make sure it is correct. The Samaritan Woman. Jesus, tired from his journey, sat down there at the well.

Jump to navigation. We used the reading from Year A since we have six people entering the church. Other parishes may have used the Year C Gospel, Luke

In those days, Jews and Samaritans hated each other. Yet Jesus talks with this Samaritan woman offering her living water. This download is not intended for mass distribution. English View other Languages. See More.

Clueless preaching about the Samaritan woman misses the point

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John , in John — The woman appears in John 4 :4—42, However below is John — But he had to go through Samaria. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar , near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob's well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well. It was about noon. A Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, "Give me a drink. The Samaritan woman said to him, "How is it that you, a Jew, ask a drink of me, a woman of Samaria? Jesus answered her, "If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, 'Give me a drink', you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.

Woman at the Well: A Story of a Loving God

By Rev. John Trigilio, Jr. Kenneth Brighenti. The Samaritan woman at the well is no angel. Mixed up with a wrong crowd, this poor woman from Samaria has quite a reputation.

Jesus Christ was the master teacher of all times. He taught in such a variety of ways.

When Jesus speaks with the Samaritan woman in John , is the passage about her husbands literal, or symbolic of the five different tribes that were settled in her town? The Samaritan woman, unlike other individuals who speak with Jesus in the Gospel of John, is never named. Some interpreters have taken this anonymity as an invitation to view her as an abstraction, a symbol of Samaria itself.

Samaritan woman at the well

Beginning the Journey for new Christians. Wilson's Books Donations Sitemap 8. Ralph F. Michael Dudash, "Living Water.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Gospel of John: The Woman at the Well

The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it. On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character. Above all, the story, which unfolds in John , suggests that Jesus is a loving and accepting God, and we should follow his example. The story begins as Jesus and his disciples travel from Jerusalem in the south to Galilee in the north. To make their journey shorter, they take the quickest route, through Samaria.

BibleGateway

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people. However, this woman was ostracized and marked as immoral, an unmarried woman living openly with the sixth in a series of men. The story of the woman at the well teaches us that God loves us in spite of our bankrupt lives. God values us enough to actively seek us, to welcome us to intimacy, and to rejoice in our worship.

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John, in John – In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic traditions, she is venerated as a  ‎Biblical account · ‎Interpretations · ‎Cultural references.

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Spiritual Rebirth: The Samaritan Woman at the Well

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4 Amazing Things We Can Learn from the Woman at the Well

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