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Looking for girlfriend > Asians > I want a guy the supremes

I want a guy the supremes

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I want a guy to love me One who will love me completely Not like the last Who's in the past Who broke my heart and made me cry. I wish that he would come and kiss me And tell me that he misses me I know someday He'll come my way And I'll never be lonely again. I don't need riches like diamond rings As long as he loves me That's everything As long as he holds me tight As long as he treats me right I'll never let him out of my sight. I want a guy to love me One who will love me completely Not like the last Who's in the past Who broke my heart and made me cry I wish that he would come and kiss me And tell me that he misses me I know someday He'll come my way And I'll never be lonely again I don't need riches like diamond rings As long as he loves me That's everything As long as he holds me tight As long as he treats me right I'll never let him out of my sight I want a guy with a love that's true One that I can tell my troubles to He'll be my guy And stay by my side I'd be so glad if I only had A guy, a guy Why can't I have a guy A guy.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: I Want A Guy (Stereo Version)

63. The Supremes: “I Want A Guy”

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The Supremes recorded 12 US No. Set against the backdrop of the meteoric rise of Motown Records and of the American civil rights movement, The Supremes played an inspirational role in changing racial perceptions and they influenced subsequent performers for many years. In the s and s, one and a half million African Americans left the impoverished rural South seeking better opportunities.

Most moved to the Northern industrial cities of Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit. It became known as 'Motor City', and saw further mass migration when its famous assembly line factories shifted to making armaments when America entered World War II in the early s. Illustration of economic migration in the USA in the mid 20th century. Black migration boomed, with , people arriving between and Competition for housing and employment sparked racial unrest, and the summer of saw extreme racial rioting, resulting in martial law.

In , Gordy created a music business which evolved into Motown Records. The Supremes soon became the embodiment of this vision. By blending the spirit of the soul movement with a touch of old showbiz, they became the epitome of Motown glamour, appealing to black and white audiences alike.

By The Supremes had made history by achieving five consecutive number one hits - a record to this day. Motown was the most successful black owned enterprise in America. Motown produced many stars. By altering the balance between vocals and bass, Motown made songs where the rhythm was key, songs that made the kids dance. Most rock and pop records are still mixed in this way today. In the s and 50s, America was still racially segregated and most African Americans had still not been granted the social freedom they had expected from slavery emancipation of In the s and 60s, the Civil Rights Movement mobilised.

Attempts to dismantle the Jim Crow Laws were met with violent resistance. There were major stand-offs and racial rioting, notably in Little Rock, Arkansas in In that year there was a critical legal change when schools were desegregated in the Brown vs.

Board of Education Act. Further social action was sparked when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white person in Amongst this turmoil, Reverend Martin Luther King Jnr rose to prominence as the leader of the movement.

He delivered his famous 'I have a Dream' speech, which mobilised the civil rights struggle into an impassioned plea for freedom. The ongoing political upheaval led to the Civil Rights Act, and the Voting Rights Act, , granting most of the demands, in theory at least, and contemporary popular music began to reflect the changing times. Maxine Powell gave lessons on the proper way to dress, eat, sit, walk and how to appear on television. To hone dance and performance skills, legendary choreographer and dancer Cholly Atkins developed the slick dance routines that were the hallmark of Motown performances, and musician Maurice King handled music and on-stage patter.

As The Supremes graced more stages and television screens, their costumes became ever more glamorous and extravagant. Chiffon and velvet were replaced by skin tight sequined evening dresses to maximise their impact under strong studio lighting.

Their trademark wigs were complemented by false eyelashes, big earrings and dramatic makeup as black cosmetics came of age. Gordy enlisted leading Hollywood designers such as Bob Mackie and Michael Travis to create glamorous and extravagant costumes fit for international superstars. Bob Mackie started off studying advertising art at Pasadena City College before he went on to win a scholarship to the Chouinard Art Institute in costume design. Following stints at Paramount studios, he moved into television.

In he designed the costumes for G. Michael Travis was a native of Detroit who moved to New York in the late s to design costumes for Broadway. In he designed The Supremes costumes for the T. The stage wardrobe of The Supremes was a major expense. On show were over 50 outfits that chart the changing image of the group, from their dresses in the early days as The Primettes, to the glamorous Hollywood designs worn at the height of their fame. It examined how the group was carefully styled by Berry Gordy and his Motown associates to appeal to the widest possible audience.

Stuart: Ladies and gentlemen, obviously, let' s begin at the beginning. Normally, the protocol is that we give people a round of applause at the end of the event. In this particular case, we' re going to break with all the protocols, because I know a lot of people that are in the audience, I' ve seen faces, I' ve seen people with reputations in the audience, and I think that all of us can say, unanimously that, Mary probably doesn' t really deeply understand how much impact her singing and her reputation has had in our lives, the way it' s shaped the love that we' ve got for the music.

So, ladies and gentlemen, Mary Wilson of The Supremes, come on. Stuart: So, where to start? Let' s start with a quick question. Mary, I wanted to -. Mary: Okay, before we go any further. I' m not the founding - the only founding member of The Supremes, as most of you know. So, the people here in the audience understand and know that, so, let' s make that very clear. Stuart: Well, let' s start with the first question, I was watching you last night in the opening of the exhibition, singing, and sung a couple of songs for us, it was great, and one of the things that struck me is, actually, without any hesitation, I' d forgotten how great a solo singer you are, how great a singer you are.

And I wonder if that actually, when we go back to The Supremes, there' s been criticisms in the past, for example, that Diana was actually the least good singer of The Supremes, she had a very specific voice. And I just wanted to get your thoughts about - just describe the different voices that were in The Supremes.

Mary: Well, I don' t think that you can - anyone said that Diane was the least good singer in The Supremes, that' s not true, and I' ve never ever said anything like that. My point was always to sort of bring forward the fact that Florence Ballard was a great singer, and I was also a good singer. So, I think people - and sometimes when we tried to explain or say things like that, people think that you' re saying that the other person is not that good.

That was not my point, at all. My point was saying that Florence Ballad was a Gospel, strong singer, Diane was a pop singer and I was kind of, like, the ballad singer, so, we each had our own, you know, good points. Stuart: And at a time, and in a city, which probably, without any hesitation, you could say was probably, at its time, the greatest musical city in the world, bar none. I mean, if you actually compare and contrast it with the other great regional city of the time, Liverpool, many of the Liverpool acts moved down to London and whatever, but there you were, in Detroit, touring the world, phenomenal place.

Just to get some grasp on this, simply your high school alone, who did you go to school with? Mary: Well, in Detroit, we all kind of grew up in the projects. Detroit was really a small - is, a small town. I went to high school with some of The Miracles, which was Bobby Rogers. The person that did a lot of singing - or writing, with Smokey Robinson, was Al Gutierrez, Marvin Tarplin, and he and I went to high school together.

Florence went to the same high school as some of The Temptations. So, we all came from pretty much the same neighbourhood, even though it was kind of large.

Stuart: And when did you first remember the sense that Mary Wilson had the desire to be a singer? Where did the desire come from? Mary: Well, you know, doctors don' t tell secrets on other doctors. But, we all kind of bad later on. But, yeah, you know, from just - oops, we don' t want to go there right now - but, anyway, when I was born, my mother said that when the doctors spanked me, I started singing. So, I mean, I did that, but I never ever thought that it was different, I thought that everybody woke up in the morning singing.

You know, I thought that everyone did that. I didn' t realise, until I became one of the members of The Primettes, that that was something very special. Then I realised that that talent was special, but, prior to that, I would just, you know, woke up and start singing, " ooooooo," you know, whatever, and just Stuart: And say a little bit about that photograph, because it connects you back to, like, many Detroit people of your generation, to the Southern States, doesn' t it?

And to the experience of moving north to Detroit, your family and whatever. So, how big was your family? Was it a musical family? What were its origins?

Mary: I actually had one of the smallest families that lived in the Brewster Projects, because my mother had - there were three of us, my baby sister, Cathy, my brother, Roosevelt, and myself, but everyone in the projects had families like, what, you know, eight, nine, ten children, so, we were kind of special, we didn' t have that many people in the family.

But, you know, it' s amazing, because my mother couldn' t read nor write, and it' s something that I' ve often thought about, how music was something that we had more in our family, because we didn' t read papers, as my mother didn' t read nor write, and it was just a fun - a fun time, even though it was very, very difficult.

My mum was on the welfare, you know, we got cheques every week, we got food for the government, you know, processed cheese, powdered eggs, you know, and stuff like that. But we had the music, so, we were very, very happy. Stuart: And in terms of the music itself, you talked about that music was around, what kind of music? Mary: Yes, well, you know, this was in the early days of Rock ' n' Roll, and you had people like Chuck Berry, you know, as I mentioned, Little Richard, and when I was a teenage girl here, I remember I used to be crazy about Jackie Wilson, that was one of my favourite people.

And, obviously, Frankie Lyman and The Teenagers was one of my favourites. So, I listened to Rock ' n' Roll, that was my favourite music. However, I grew up listening to Jazz in the household, because that - Jazz and Blues, because that' s what my family more or less listened to.

Stuart: And were you someone that was, in any way, as you would describe, trained as a musician? Or was it something that was just evolutionary? Mary: I remember that, when I was in about the sixth grade, maybe earlier than that, actually, I was in one of the glee clubs, and they just pulled me in there, and every year after that, I was always in some type of musical group, in school, you know, like the glee club, the choir. And when I went on to elementary school, like the eighth grade, that' s when I met Florence Ballard and started really, really singing.

But I never had any formal training other than what we received at school. And we had great teachers. That' s one thing about Detroit, Michigan, the educational system was so good that we had trainers to teach us.

And one teacher wanted Florence and I to be opera singers. And I remember, we would sing arias, like -.

THE SUPREMES

It was also recorded by The Marvelettes. Featuring Diana Ross, going by her given name, Diane Ross, in lead, the song was a doo-wop ballad similar to what the Supremes had been recording since forming as "The Primettes" two years earlier. The songs lyrics tell about a lonely woman who wants a new lover who won't mistreat her and always be loyal to her. I want a guy to love me One who will love me completely Not like the last Who's in the past Who broke my heart and made me cryWhen issued, the song failed to chart forcing Berry Gordy to find other options for the teenage quartet - its full lineup included Barbara Martin alongside Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson.

It was also recorded by The Marvelettes. Featuring Diana Ross, going by her given name, Diane Ross, in lead, the song was a doo-wop ballad similar to what the Supremes had been recording since forming as "The Primettes" two years earlier.

It's hard to imagine that The Supremes were once the least successful group on the Motown label. The Marvelettes had already rejected it, with lead singer Wanda Rogers tagging it "the most pitiful tune we'd ever heard. The 'Dream Girls' would eventually score a dozen American number ones before the sixties were over. How different pop history might have been if that had happened.

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Before Diana Ross, Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard became the most successful girl group of the rock era, Motown released eight singles by The Supremes , none of which charted in the top 20 of the Billboard Hot

The designated second- and third-banana members of The Supremes , the leading American music group of the s, both have loyal, unwavering fans. Florence Ballard , in particular, has had staunch supporters all along. The unofficial leader of the group in its early years, she was arguably the best choice for lead singer.

I Want A Guy Lyrics

From until the end of the decade, The Supremes would become the savior of American music, almost single-handedly defending a corner of the industry from the British Invasion while conquering the rest of the world through sell-out tours and hit singles. Still, without a sizable hit or much audience demand for its existence, Meet The Supremes failed to make an impact. So what happened?

Automatically playing similar songs. Get Notified about the latest hits and trends, so that you are always on top of the latest in music when it comes to your friends. Autoplaying Similar Tracks Automatically playing similar songs. Explicit Content. Okay, Got it!

I Want a Guy Lyrics

Featuring Diana Ross , going by her given name, Diane Ross, in lead, the song was a doo-wop ballad similar to what the Supremes had been recording since forming as "The Primettes" two years earlier. The song's lyrics tell about a lonely woman who wants a new lover who won't mistreat her and always be loyal to her. When issued, the song failed to chart forcing Berry Gordy to find other options for the teenage quartet - its full lineup included Barbara Martin alongside Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson. In between the two singles the teenaged girls would replace Betty McGlown with Martin, and the new quartet would be recording under a new name and under a new record deal. This song would be issued as a b-side of a Marvelettes hit " Twistin' Postman " later that year and would be led by Wanda Rogers, one of her first with the group. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In Japan Sparkle film Dreamgirls musical Dreamgirls film Sparkle film.

"I Want a Guy" is a song written by Freddie Gorman, Berry Gordy and Brian girl group The Supremes in

The Supremes recorded 12 US No. Set against the backdrop of the meteoric rise of Motown Records and of the American civil rights movement, The Supremes played an inspirational role in changing racial perceptions and they influenced subsequent performers for many years. In the s and s, one and a half million African Americans left the impoverished rural South seeking better opportunities. Most moved to the Northern industrial cities of Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit. It became known as 'Motor City', and saw further mass migration when its famous assembly line factories shifted to making armaments when America entered World War II in the early s.

Diana Ross & The Supremes - I Want A Guy lyrics

The Supremes started out as a quartet known as the Primettes. In two fifteen year olds, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson, met at a talent show. Milton Jenkins, who managed a local doo wop group the Primes, wanted a sister group to accompany the Primes for stage performances. Ballard remembered Wilson and the two of them brought in sixteen year old Betty Travis.

I Want a Guy

The Supremes: the Motown group. Some history. In which case, sit down. At some stage they also recruited guitarist Marv Tarplin, who ended up being poached by Smokey for the Miracles.

It was also recorded by The Marvelettes. Featuring Diana Ross, going by her given name, Diane Ross, in lead, the song was a doo-wop ballad similar to what the Supremes had been recording since forming as "The Primettes" two years earlier.

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Comments: 1
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